FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS!

 

IS THERE A FEE TO SWITCH ENERGY?

No. There are not charges to switch your service to a different REP. Yet ask your salesman if there are any (ETF’s) Early Termination Fee’s when he is switching your account.

 

DO I NEED TO LET MY CURRENT PROVIDER KNOW THAT I AM SWITCHING?

No. It is not necessary to notify your current provider of your intent to switch. Before deciding to switch, we recommend referring to the Energy Facts Label (EFL) associated with your current rate, especially if you committed to a service period greater than 6 months. In these instances, your current provider may assess an early termination fee. Once you have completed your enrollment, we will notify your utility of your request to switch suppliers on your behalf. No additional action is needed on your part.

 

HOW DO I SIGN UP FOR a new electricity plan?

Sign up via the web at www.affinity-power.com/residential or call us toll-free at 855-508-3926

 

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO SWITCH MY ELECTRICITY SERVICE?

Your utility controls how long it can take to switch your electric service. In utilities like CenterPoint, Oncor, AEP Central, AEP North, or Texas-New Mexico Power, your switch can occur in 3 to 5 days, depending on your meter read cycle.

 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN MY CONTRACT EXPIRES?

Affinity Power will send you a notice before your contract end date letting you know that it is time to renew your electricity service. At that time, we’ll offer you the best rate possible for continued service at your home or business.

 

DEPOSITS

 

DEPOSIT WAIVER PROGRAM

You are eligible to receive a waiver for the deposit if you meet one of the following criteria:

a) If you are 65+ years old 

If you are 65 years of age or older and do not have any overdue electricity payments, please send us a copy of your driver’s license and most recent electricity or utility bill. 

b) If you are a victim of violence 

If you are a victim of domestic violence as recognized by the Texas Council on Family Violence, you can send us a completed and signed certification letter from the Texas Council on Family Violence to confirm your status. The signed certification must be dated within the last 12 months. 

c) If you are in good standing with another electricity retailer and have been for the past 12 months. 

If you have been a residential customer of any retail electric provider or an electric utility and were not late paying a bill more than once in the last 12 months, please contact your current electricity provider to provide a letter of credit on your behalf. 

d) If you are medically indigent. 

You are considered medically indigent as certified by a government entity or government funded energy assistance program and physician. 

e) If you are Active Military. 

If you are currently serving in the U.S. Military, send a copy of your active military ID.

 

WHEN WILL I RECEIVE MY DEPOSIT REFUND?

Deposits are returned at the end of your Energy plan term. You will receive your deposit refund if you meet the following requirements:

• You must have remained an active customer throughout your contract term 
• You paid your bill on time each month throughout your contract term

If you decide at the end of your contract, the deposit will first be applied to any outstanding balance that you may have on your account. If you have any remaining deposit amount, it will appear as a credit on your final bill. Once you receive your final bill and make your payment on time, the credit will be refunded to you.

 

WHO DO I CONTACT IF I HAVE BILLING QUESTIONS?

If you have a question about your energy charges, you can call the customer service phone on your bill. If you are not satisfied with the answer, please contact your sales representative.

WHO DO I CALL IF I HAVE A POWER OUTAGE?

Your local utility is responsible for maintaining your electric service which includes the power lines and poles. In the event of an emergency or power outage, please contact your local utility company at the number provided on your bill.

What is deregulation?

Deregulation is the opening of a market to competition in a previously regulated industry. Texas Senate Bill 7, on January 1, 2002, created a deregulated electricity industry in Texas, allowing many consumers the opportunity to buy electricity from any Retail Electricity Provider (REP) they choose. Many consumers no longer have only one option for electricity. They can shop around for the best plan and, in many cases, lower their electric bill. Not all of Texas was deregulated. Certain municipalities still have an entity that continues to provide their electric service, but approximately 75% of Texas is deregulated.

What do all the acronyms and terms mean? 

When shopping for electricity, you will run across quite a few acronyms and terms. Here are a few more common ones.

Base Charge

A charge assessed during each billing cycle without regard to the customer's demand or energy consumption.

Demand Charge

A charge based on the rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system at a given instant, or averaged over a designated period, during the billing cycle.

EFL – Electricity Facts Label

A document provided with any product which clearly states the average rate at 500 kWH, 1000 kWh and 2000 kWH usages. The rates should include ALL recurring charges that you will incur.

Energy Charge

A charge based on the electric energy (kWh) consumed.

ERCOT – Electricity Reliability Council of Texas

ERCOT operates the huge electric grid and manages the deregulated market. They make sure there is ample energy in the grid at all times to supply demand.

ESI or ESIID – Electric Service Identifier ID

This is a number which identifies the service location. It never changes and will always identify that specific geographic location, even if a meter is changed or removed.

Late Payment Penalty

A charge assessed for late payment in accordance with Public Utility Commission rules.

kW

Kilowatt, the standard unit for measuring electricity demand, equal to 1,000 watts.

kWh – Kilowatt Hour

kWh – Kilowatt Hour Kilowatt-hour, the standard unit for measuring electricity energy consumption, equal to 1,000 watt-hours. 

PUC or PUCT – Public Utility Commission of Texas

This is the governing body that makes electricity rules in the state of Texas. They have authority over everything from generation to retail.

REP – Retail Electric Provider

A REP sells electricity to retail customers in the areas of Texas that have been deregulated. A REP buys wholesale electricity, delivery service, and related services, prices electricity for customers, and sells electricity at retail.

TDSP – Transmission and Distribution Service Provider

The local wires and poles company that is responsible for making sure that you get power at your home or business. They are responsible for everything involving the wires, poles and your meter. For example, CenterPoint Energy is the TDSP in the Houston area — in Dallas it is Oncor).

TOS – Terms of Service

The TOS is a document outlining all the terms and conditions related to electricity service. These rules set out the rights and responsibilities of both the Retail Electric Provider and the customer.

How do I prepare for hurricane or other storms this season?

Check out these guidelines from Texas Division of Emergency Management.

HURRICANE PREPARATION 

Texas Division of Emergency Management

Hurricane Preparedness Guidelines - Preparing for Hurricane Season: June 1- Nov.30

IF YOU ARE UNDER A HURRICANE WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY.

 

When a hurricane is 36 hours from arriving

  • Turn on your TV or radio in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

  • Restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include food and water sufficient for at least three days, medications, a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies. https://www.ready.gov/build-a-kit 

When a hurricane is 18-36 hours from arriving

  • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.

  • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.

When a hurricane is 6-18 hours from arriving

  • Turn on your TV/radio or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

  • Charge your cell phone now so you will have a full battery in case you lose power.

When a hurricane is 6 hours from arriving

  • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.

  • Close storm shutters and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.

  • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.

Survive DURING

  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.

  • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.

  • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.

  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.

  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.